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I am a scholar of feminist theory, specializing in feminist science studies, twentieth century continental philosophy, continental philosophy of science, and origins of life research. Currently, I am a Ph.D. candidate at Duke University in The Program in Literature and a Dissertation Fellow in The Program in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. I am completing my dissertation, The Im/material Conditions of Emergence: Towards a Feminist Philosophy of The Origins of Life, under the direction of Elizabeth Grosz and Mark B.N. Hansen. 

The overarching theme of my current and future research directs itself to a feminist and theoretical reformulation of the relation between matter and life in a way that can account for emergence.  In my scholarship, I spotlight philosophical and scientific research that begins with the assumption that becoming is more primordial than being. My dissertation, The Im/material Conditions of Emergence: Towards a Feminist Philosophy of The Origins of Life, argues that majority of historical scientific research (and cultural ideas) of the emergence of life from matter rest on ideas of a life bringing a “vital spark” to matter. I develop a feminist philosophy of life through continental thinkers who give becoming primacy over being in work (Henri Bergson, Ilya Prigogine, Gilbert Simondon, Raymond Ruyer, Luce Irigaray, and Elizabeth Grosz) and origins of life research from the previous and current century. 

I have presented my work and organized panels in national and international venues, including The Society for Existential and Speculative Philosophy, philoSOPHIA: A Society for Continental Feminism, The International Association for Environmental Philosophy, The North American and European Societies for Science, Literature, and the Arts, The National Women's Studies Association, and The Irigaray Circle.